graduate

SCR-584 Fire Control Radar


Photograph of deployed SCR-584 radar

U.S. Army. Via Wikipedia


Specifications:

Wavelength 10 cm
Pulse Width 0.8 microsecond
Pulse Repetition Frequency       1700 Hz
Power 300 kW
Range Detection at 50 nautical miles (90 km)
Automatic tracking at 15 nautical miles (30 km)
Scope
PPI
Production
1700 sets from 1943-7 to 1945-8


The SCR-584 was a mobile gunlaying radar known as the GL Mark 3A in British service. The finest fire control set of the Second World War, it was equipped with a PPI display for detection mode and automatically tracked a target once acquired. It was capable of tracking moving vehicles and even troops and remained in use until 1996. It was very effective against aircraft when combined with the M-9 director. Once locked onto an aircraft, it could automatically aim and fire a remote power-controlled gun, whose crew needed only to keep reloading. The SCR-584 could even locate artillery from the shell trajectories, and it was capable of directing ground support aircraft.

Because the SCR-584 could track aircraft moving as fast as 600 mph (965 km/h), it was employed successfully against the V-1 "buzz bombs" launched by Germany in late 1944. Priority was given to the European theater, but units were operating in the Philippines by 1945. SCR-584 also became the basis for the SM-1 fighter direction radar used on Allied carriers in the Pacific.

References

Buderi (1998)
Guerlac (1987)
Hogg (2002)


Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional