graduate

Ando Rikichi (1884-1946)


Photograph of Ando Rikichi

Imperial Japanese Army. Via Wikipedia Commons

If any one person can be said to be responsible for the Pacific War, it might well be Ando Rikichi, a hotheaded Japanese Army general who moved troops from his South China Area Army into French Indochina on his own authority in September 1940, following the German defeat of France.  This outraged the United States and further poisoned the already shaky relations between the U.S. and Japan.  In the topsy-turvy world of Tokyo politics, the civilian government dared not lose face by reversing Ando’s actions, but he was recalled to Japan and forced to retire in January 1941.

When war became imminent, in November 1941, Ando was recalled, promoted, and placed in command of Formosa Army.  He served here throughout the war.

Ando misjudged American intentions in the spring of 1945, moving the crack 9 Division from Okinawa to Formosa. He also disagreed with Ushijima's plan to defend in depth, preferring to meet the Americans at the water's edge, but did not press the issue.

Ando committed suicide in 1946 to avoid prosecution for war crimes.

Service record

1884

Born
1914

Joins Japanese Army
1924     

Instructor, Army War College
1925

Military attache, India
1927

Army General Staff
1928
Colonel     
Commander, 13 Regiment
1930

Chief of staff, 5 Division
1931

Chief, Military Administration Section, War Ministry
1932

Military attache, Britain
1934

General Staff
1934
Major general Commander, 1 Brigade
1935-8

Commandant, Toyama Army Infantry School
1936-4

Commander, 5 Independent Garrison Unit
1937-7

Deputy inspector-general of training
1938-2-11
Lieutenant general      Acting inspector-general of training
1938-6-3

Commander, 5 Division
1938-11-9

Commander, 21 Army
1940-2-10

Commander, South China Area Army
1940-10-5

General Staff
1941-1      

Retired from active duty
1941-11-6     

Recalled to command Formosa Army
1944-9-22
General Commander, 10 Area Army
1944-12-30     

Governor-general of Formosa
1946

Commits suicide

References

Dunnigan and Nofi (1998)

Fuller (1992)

Generals.dk (accesssed 2007-11-3)

Huber (1990; accessed 2011-7-23)

Pettibone (2007)



Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional