F1M2 "Pete", Japanese Reconnaissance Floatplane

Photograph of F1M "Pete"

U.S. Navy. Via Francillon (1979)

3-view diagram of F1M "Pete"

U.S. Army. Via

Mitsubishi F1M2 "Pete"


2 in tandem open cockpit


36'1"by 31'2" by 13'1"
11.00m by 9.50m by 3.99m


4251-5622 lbs
1928-2550 kg
Wing area 318 square feet
29.5 square meters

Maximum speed      

230 mph at 11,290 feet
370 km/h at 3440 meters

Climb rate

28 feet per second
8.5 meters per second


30,970 feet
9440 meters

Power plant

One 875 hp (652 kW) Mitsubishi Zuisei 13 14-cylinder air-cooled radial engine driving a three-blade metal propeller.


Two forward-firing 7.7mm Type 97 machine guns
One flexible rear-firing 7.7mm Type 92 machine gun

External stores      

Two 60kg (132 lb) bombs


460 miles
740 km
54 gallons
204 liters


A total of 1118 F1Ms were built.

  Mitsubishi Jukogyo K.K., Nagoya:
    524 F1M2
  Dai-Nijuichi Kaigun Kokusho, Sasebo:
    590 F1M2


The F1M1 was produced only in protype.

A small number were converted to the F1M2-K advanced trainer.

"Pete" was the only short-range observation float plane accepted for full production by the Japanese Navy, and it was standard on all carriers and battleships. It also operated from shore bases. Because of its outstanding maneuverability, it was occasionally operated as a fighter and dive-bomber in support of amphibious operations, when no enemy fighter opposition was anticipated.

The design dated to late 1934, when the Navy issued a specification for a replacement for the E8N1 "Dave" to Aichi, Kawanishi, and Mitsubishi. The Mitsubishi design team, led by Hattori Joji, completed a prototype in June 1936. The design was very clean and outperformed the Aichi contender, but had poor stability. This was corrected in the F1M2, which was ordered into production by the Navy.


Francillon (1979)
Williams and Gustin (2003)

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