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P-26 Peashooter, U.S. Fighter


Photograph of P-26 Peashooter

U.S. Air Force. Via Wikipedia Commons.


Boeing P-26A Peashooter


Specifications:


Crew 1
Dimensions 27'11.5" by 23'9" by 10'0.5"
8.52m by 7.24m by 3.06m
Wing area 150 square feet
13.9 square meters
Weight 2200-3075 lbs
1000-1395 kg
Maximum speed       226 mph (363 km/h) at 15,000 feet (4600 meters)
235 mph (378 km/h) at 7500 feet (2300 meters)
211 mph (339 km/h) at sea level
Cruise speed 199 mph
320 km/h
Climb rate 39 feet per second
11.9 meters per second
Service ceiling 27,400 feet
8350 meters
Power plant 1 600 hp (447 kW) Pratt & Whitney SR-1340-33 Wasp direct-injection 9-cylinder radial engine, driving a Hamilton Standard ground-adjustable metal two-bladed propeller.
Armament 1 0.30 Colt-Browning fixed nose machine gun (500 rounds)
1 0.50 Colt-Browning fixed nose machine gun (200 rounds)
External stores up to 200 lbs (91 kg) bombs or two 43 gallon (163 liter) wing drop tanks
Range 313 nautical miles (580 km) on internal fuel
495 nautical miles (917 km) with drop tanks
Fuel 88 gallons (333 liters) internal
Production 111 P-26A, 2 P-26B, 23 P-26C by 1934 at Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, WA.
Variants

The P-26B introduced fuel-injected engines and split flaps.

The P-26C had just the flaps.


The P-26 Peashooter was an innovative design when first introduced in 1934. In fact, it was rumored that Boeing was careful not to be too innovative for the conservative Army Air Corps.

The design was obsolete by the time war broke out in the Pacific. Nevertheless, some were still in use with the Hawaiian and Philippine air forces.

This was the first monoplane fighter placed in squadron service by the Army Air Corps, and the last fighter aircraft Boeing placed in production until the F/A-22 Raptor in 1997.


References

Boeing. com (accessed 2009-9-28)

Gunston (1986)



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