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Ushiroku Jun (1884-1973)


Photograph of Ushiroku Jun

Japanese Army. Via Wikipedia Commons

Ushiroku Jun was commissioned in the infantry in 1905 and served with the Siberian Expedition on 1919. He filled numerous staff assignments thereafter. By February 1944, he was deputy Army Chief of Staff. He was severely criticized by fellow officers for suggesting suicide tactics against tanks due to the shortage of effective antitank weapons.

Ushiroku commanded Japanese forces at Saipan but escaped back to Japan before the island fell. In disgrace for ordering suicide attacks by his men, he was transferred to Manchuria in July 1944 to take command of 3 Area Army at Mukden.

When the Russians invaded in 9 August 1945, Ushiroku ignored orders to retreat and launched a counterattack to protect the Mukden-Port Arthur rail line, along which Japanese civilians were fleeing. He was protected in this disobedience to orders by Tojo and other powerful friends in Tokyo.

By 13 August his formations had all but disintegrated, and a mutiny by Manchurian puppet troops at Changchun spoiled any effort to regroup. He surrendered to the Russians on 21 August 1945 and was not repatriated until 1956.

Service record

1884    

Born
1905
Second lieutenant
Commissioned an infantry officer
1917

Graduates from Army War College
1929
Colonel     
Commander, 48 Regiment
1931

Chief of staff, 4 Division
1932

Kwantung Army
1934-8-1
Major general
Head of 3 Bureau, Army General Staff
1935-8-13

Head of Personnel Bureau, Ministry of War
1937-3-1

Head of Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War
1937-10-5   
Lieutenant general     
Commander, 26 Division
1939-8-1

Commander, 4 Army
1940-10-5

Commander, South China Area Army
1941-7-7

Chief of staff, China Expeditionary Army
1942-8-17

Commander, Central District Army
1944-2-21     

Deputy chief of staff, Army General Staff
1944

Supreme War Council
1944-3-28

Inspector-general of Army Aviation
1944

Head of aeronautical bureau, Ministry of War
1944-8-25   

Commander, 3 Area Army
1945-8-21     

POW in Russia
1956-12-26     

Repatriated
1973

Dies

References

Frank (1999)
Fuller (1992)

Generals.dk (accessed 2007-11-14)

Hayashi and Cox (1959)
Pettibone (2007)



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