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Li Hsien-chou (1894-1988)


Photograph of Li Hsien-chou

republicanchina.org

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Li Hsien-chou (Li Xianzhou) was deputy commander of 15 Army Group and head of the Shantung Cadre Training Center of the Central Military Academy when war broke out in the Pacific. He commanded 28 Army Group from 1943 onwards.

Dorn (1974) relates a claim by a Chinese colonel, Yao Ts'an-mou, that Li was guilty of cowardice while commanding 21 Division near Nankow, northwest of Peiping, in 1937:

That son of a bitch in Kalgan [Li] beat us. We had the Japs on ice, and suddenly without any warning he ran away and left the back door open. How could we stay in Nankow after that? It was terrible. I could not take any food for a week, and everybody was weeping very bitter tears. The general [T'ang En-po] tried to kill himself, and we had to restrain him.

In February 1947, during the Chinese Civil War, Li inflicted a brief setback on the Chinese Communists along the Tsingtao-Tsinan corridor, but was wounded and captured. He was released in a general amnesty in 1960, and thereafter held a number of nominal posts in the Communist government.

Service record

1894-6-17     

Born
1927-5
Lieutenant colonel     
Commander, Replacement Regiment, 2 Division, 1 Army
1927-9
Colonel     
Commander, Training Regiment, 1 Army
1928-7

Deputy commander, 1 Brigade, 1 Army
1928-11

Commander, 13 Regiment, 7 Brigade, 3 Division, 1 Army
1932-5
Major general      Commander, 9 Brigade, 3 Division, 1 Army
1933-7-21

Deputy commander, 1 Division, 1 Army
1934-12-15     
Lieutenant general       Commander, 21 Division
1938-2-12

Commander, 92 Army
1941-5-6

Deputy commander, 15 Army Group
1943-2-24

Commander, 28 Army Group
1945-2

2 General's Class A, War College
1945-6

Commander, 28 Army Group
1946-3

Deputy commander, 2 Pacification Area
1947-2-23

Wounded
1947-2-23

Captured by the Chinese Communists
1960-11-28     

Released
1988-10-22     

Dies

References

Dorn (1974)

Ammentorp (accessed 2016-2-23)

Hsu and Chang (1971)

RepublicanChina.org (accessed 2010-12-23)


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