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Wei Li-huang (1897-1960)


Photograph of Wei Li-huang

Generals.dk

Wei Li-huang (Wei Lihuang) joined the Kuomintang in the early 1920s and participated in the Northern Expedition of 1926-1928. The outbreak of the Pacific War found him in command of 1 War Area. He later relieved Ch'en Ch'eng as commander of Y Force in Burma.

One of the most capable and least corrupt of the Kuomintang generals, Wei was known as "Hundred Victories Wei" for his successes against the Communists. Chiang Kai-shek is alleged to have bought him off with land to ensure his political reliability.  He had a modern education and was highly pro-American; his chief fault was that he was ponderous in his thinking, looking at all sides of a problem when prompt action would have been more appropriate. For example, after taking Che-fang during the Salween campaign with a skillful flanking move, Wei waited a full month before moving on Wanting.

Postwar Wei again relieved Ch'en Ch'eng, this time in Manchuria. The fall of Chinchow left him isolated; his planned counterattack was forbidden by Chiang, who relieved him of command. He fled to Taiwan (Formosa) with the Kuominitang in 1949 and retired in 1955.

Service record

1897    

Born
1937
Lieutenant general     
Commander, 14 Army Group
1938

Commander, Southern Route Force, 2 War Area
1938

Commander, 1 War Area
1942

Commander, Yunnan Expeditionary Forces
1944

Deputy commander, Army Headquarters
1947

Commander, Nationalist Forces in Manchuria
1960

Dies


References

Dupuy et al. (1992)

Dorn (1974)

Generals.dk (accessed 2008-5-1)

Romanus and Sunderland (1958; accessed 2012-12-23)

Sih (1977)

Wilson (1982)


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