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Kirov Class, Russian Cruisers


Photograph of Kirov-class cruiser

Wikipedia Commons


Specifications:


Tonnage 7756 tons standard displacement
Dimensions 626'8" by 57'11" by 23'9"
191.0m by 17.65m by 7.24m
Maximum speed       36 knots
Complement
872
Aircraft
1 catapult
1 seaplane
Armament 3x3 7.1" guns
8x1 3.34" guns
10x1 37mm AA guns
6 0.50 machine guns
2x3 21" torpedo tubes
60 mines
Protection
2.75" (70mm) belt and bulkheads
2" (50mm) deck
2.75"/2"/2.75"/2" (70mm/50mm/70mm/50mm) turret faces/sides/roofs/rears
2.75" (70mm) barbettes
5.9"/2" (150mm/50mm) conning tower sides/roof
1.2" (30mm) steering box
Machinery
2-shaft geared turbine (113,000 shp)
6 Yarrow-Normand boilers
Bunkerage 1280 tons fuel oil
Range 3750 nautical miles 6940 km) at 18 knots
Modifications
May have received radar by the end of the war


The Kirovs were modern cruisers constructed by the Soviet Union at the Vladivostok naval base as well as other Navy yards. They were the first large warships laid down in Russia since the October Revolution of 1917. Ironically, with Russian industry still struggling to modernize in 1933, the Russians sought Italian assistance in their design and they were based on the light cruiser Raimondo Montecuccoli. The design was modified for the heavy seas and severe icing of the Baltic.

Neither participated actively in the brief period of Russian hostilities against Japan, but would doubtless have been employed against any significant light forces that Japan might have scraped together against the Russian landings in the Kuriles. Armed with 7-inch guns, they were technically heavy cruisers but were intermediate between the heavy and light cruisers of those nations that adhered to the Washington naval limitations.


Units in the Pacific:

Kalinin completed 1942-12 (Vladivostok)
Kaganovich       completed 1944-12 (Vladivostok)


References

Gogin (2010; accessed 2012-12-26)

Whitley (1995)


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