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R-1830 Aircraft Engine


Photograph of R-1830
          aircraft engine
National Museum of the USAF

The Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp was an air-cooled supercharged radial aircraft engine with fourteen cylinders arranged in two rows. Bore and stroke were both 5.5 inches (140mm). It was first introduced in 1932 and had a high compression ratio (6.5) requiring very high octane gasoline. Successive models progressed from single-stage to two-stage supercharging and then to turbosupercharging. The R-1830 was efficient and mechanically reliable and was used on a large number of aircraft models. The -43 and -65 marks have been described as "probably the most realiable air-cooled radials ever built" (Simons 2012). The later models could sustain a maximum 2400 rotations per minute and weighed around 1470 lbs (667 kg). Total production was 178,000. Over 13,464 were built for the C-47 alone.

Model
Horsepower
Wattage
Notes
9
1000 hp at 11,500 feet
900 hp at 12,000 feet
750 kW at 3500 m
670 kW at 3700 m

17
1200 hp takeoff
1050 hp at 10,000 feet
890 kW at takeoff
780 kW at 3000 m

57
1200 hp
890 kW

64
900 hp takeoff
850 hp at 8000 feet
670 kW takeoff
630 kW at 2400 m

65
1200 hp at 26,500 feet 895 kW at 8077 m
76
1200 hp takeoff
1000 hp at 19,000 feet
890 kW at takeoff
750 kW at 5800 m
First aircraft engine with two-stage supercharging
90D
1200 hp
890 kW

92
1200 hp
1000 hp at 19,000 feet
890 kW
750 kW at 5800 m

G205A
1200 hp
890 kW

S3C4G 1200 hp 890 kW

Aircraft using the R-1830 included the P-35, P-36 Hawk, P-43 Lancer, A-28 Hudson, B-24 Liberator, C-47 Skytrain, F4F Wildcat, TBD Devastator, Beaufort, Boomerang, Sunderland, PBY Catalina, and PB2Y Coronado.

Photo Gallery

Twin Wasp mounted in an engine nacelle

Library of

Congress

Twin Wasp with associated equipment labeled

Wikimedia

Commons

Twin Wasp and crankcase

Wikimedia

Commons

References

Gunston (2006)

National Museum of the USAF (accessed 2009-1-30)

PBYRescue.com (accessed 2009-3-14)

Simons (2012)


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