graduate

PBM Mariner, U.S. Flying Boat


Photograph of PBM Mariner being tended

National Archives #80-G-483681


Martin PBM-3C Mariner


Specifications:


Crew 7 to 8
Dimensions 118' by 80' by 27'6"
36.0m by 24.4m by 8.4m
Wing area 1408 square feet
130.8 square meters
Weight 32,378-58,000 lbs
14,686-26,000 kg
Maximum speed       198 mph at 13,000 feet
319 km/h at 4000 meters
Cruise speed 135 mph
217 km/h
Landing speed 76 mph
122 km/h
Climb rate 7 feet per second
2.1 meters per second
Service ceiling 16,900 feet
5150 meters
Power plant two 1700 hp (1268 kW) R-2600-12 Wright Cyclone 14-cylinder two-row radial engines driving four bladed propellers
Armament 1 twin 0.50 dorsal turret
1 twin 0.50 nose turret
2 0.50 machine guns in waists
2 0.50 machine guns in tail
External stores 2000 lbs (910 kg) of bombs or depth charges
Range 2137 miles
3439 km
Fuel 1950-2744 gallons
Sensors
ASG surface search radar
Production 1405 of all types at The Glenn L. Martin Company, Baltimore, MD:
  1 XPBM-1
  20 PBM-1
  1 XPBM-2
  32 PBM-3B/GR.I
  274 PBM-3C
  201 PBM-3D
  50 PBM-3R
  156 PBM-3S
  2 XPBM-5
  631 PBM-5
  1 XPBM-5A
  36 PBM-5A
Variants

The -3D could carry up to 8000 lbs of ordinance, including two underwing torpedoes.

The -3R was a transport version.

The -3S was an antisubmarine version.

The -5 had an APS-15 radar and 2100 hp (1566 kW) R-2800-34 engines.

The -5A was an amphibious version of the -5


The Martin Mariner was the successor to the Catalina, and was somewhat overshadowed by its famous predecessor. It was an excellent patrol aircraft that continued in production after the war, but, like most modern aircraft, required much from the pilots and crew. The Mariner was very stable, but had high wing and power loadings. It was capable of carrying a very heavy weapons loadout internally and was an excellent antisubmarine platform.

The concept was first tested with a quarter-scale single seat prototype, which was followed by a full-size prototype that first flew on 18 February 1939. This demonstrated the need for the distinctive dihedral tailplanes. The first production aircraft were delivered in 1941. Some 25 were given to the British as Lend-Lease in August 1943 but were returned to the United States six weeks later.


References

Gunston (1986)

Wilson (1998)



Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional