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Farragut Class, U.S. Destroyers


Photograph of
                  Farragut-class destroyer

National Archives # 19-N-14753

Schematic diagram of Farragut class destroyer

ONI 222

Specifications:

Tonnage 1395 tons standard
Dimensions 341'3" by 34'3" by 16'4"
104.01m by 10.44m by 1.96m
Maximum speed       36.5 knots
Complement 250
Armament 5x1 5"/38 dual-purpose guns
4 0.50 machine guns
2x4 21" torpedo tubes
2 depth charge tracks (14 depth charges)
Machinery
2-shaft geared turbine (42,800 shp)
4 Yarrow boilers
Bunkerage 400 tons fuel oil
Range 6500 nautical miles (12,000km) at 12 knots
5800 nautical miles (10,700km) at 15 knots
Sensors
QC sonar
Modifications
Early 1942: One 5" mount and machine guns replaced with 8x1 20mm Oerlikon AA guns.

By 1943: Radar added, generally SC, SG, and FD. Three of the single 20mm guns replaced with 2x2 40mm Bofors.

At some point two depth charge throwers were added to most units.


The Farraguts were completed in 1934-1935 and were the first U.S. destroyers built since the early 1920s. Designed to replace the aging "flush-deckers", they were a good design for their time, being the first U.S. destroyers to mount 5" dual-purpose guns, which used new director technology superior to its foreign counterparts. All armament was put on the centerline, where it could contribute to either broadside, and a raised forecastle was re-introduced to reduce the wetness of the ships forward. The stern hull form was improved and, with it, maneuverability. However, the guns still did not have enclosed mounts (just shields on the two forward guns) and the ships were somewhat lightly built, with longitudinal framing and welded construction to reduce weight. They were also too top heavy, a fault that would continue to characterize U.S. destroyer designs prior to the Fletchers. This would prove fatal to the Hull and Monaghan when they capsized in a typhoon late in the war. Oddly, the ships completed with sonar but no depth charge racks. However, provisions were made to add these in time of war, and these were almost certainly in place by the time war broke out in the Pacific.

American sailors had become fond of the "flush-deckers", and the new ships were derisively nicknamed the "Gold Platers" for their comparatively lavish facilities.


Units in the Pacific:

Aylwin

Pearl Harbor


Dale

Pearl Harbor


Farragut

Pearl Harbor


Hull

Pearl Harbor

Foundered in a typhoon 1944-12-17 off Luzon

MacDonough      

Pearl Harbor


Monaghan Pearl Harbor Foundered in a typhoon 1944-12-17 off Luzon
Worden Pearl Harbor Grounded and lost 1943-1-12 in the Aleutians
Dewey Task Force 11 (Halsey, Enterprise) west of Oahu      

Photo Gallery


Profile view of Farragut-class destroyer

U.S. Navy

Close view of Farragut forward superstructure

U.S. Navy

Close view of Farragut superstructure

U.S. Navy

Close view of Farragut superstructure

U.S. Navy

Aft
                quarter view of Farragut-class destroyer

U.S. Navy

Overhead view of Farragut-class destroyer, 1944
                mods

U.S. Navy

Forward view of Farragut-class destroyer, 1944
                mods

U.S. Navy


References

DANFS

Friedman (2004)

Gogin (2010; accessed 2012-12-21)

Whitley (1988)

Worth (2001)


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